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    City or Township Devon, PA
    Postal Code 19333, PA
    Neighborhood Neighborhood, Devon, PA
    School District School District, County, PA
    Listing Service Area Area, PA
    Address 123 Main St, Devon, PA
    Street Main St, Devon, PA
    Listing ID #123456
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    • A1 ASHBOURNE RD ELKINS PARK, PA A1 ASHBOURNE RD, ELKINS PARK, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $15,500,000 
    • 920 SPRING AVE ELKINS PARK, PA 920 SPRING AVE, ELKINS PARK, PA Lot/Land for sale. $15,500,000 
    • 525 LEWIS LN AMBLER, PA 525 LEWIS LN, AMBLER, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $7,999,000 Price reduced from $9,250,000 (-$1,251,000)
    • 901 BRUSHTOWN RD LOWER GWYNEDD, PA 901 BRUSHTOWN RD, LOWER GWYNEDD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $2,750,000 
    • 1345 GYPSY HILL RD GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA 1345 GYPSY HILL RD, GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $2,600,000 Price reduced from $2,950,000 (-$350,000)
    • 6234 PIDCOCK CREEK RD NEW HOPE, PA 6234 PIDCOCK CREEK RD, NEW HOPE, PA Farm/Ranch for sale. $2,480,000 
    • 6234 PIDCOCK CREEK RD NEW HOPE, PA 6234 PIDCOCK CREEK RD, NEW HOPE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $2,480,000 
    • 1233 MERRYBROOK RD WORCESTER, PA 1233 MERRYBROOK RD, WORCESTER, PA Farm/Ranch | Detached for sale. $2,250,000 
    • 2200 ARCH ST #103 PHILADELPHIA, PA 2200 ARCH ST #103, PHILADELPHIA, PA Commercial for sale. $2,200,000 
    • 1708 N LIMEKILN PIKE WILLOW GROVE, PA 1708 N LIMEKILN PIKE, WILLOW GROVE, PA Commercial for sale. $1,995,000 
    • 3160 DEER CREEK RD WORCESTER, PA 3160 DEER CREEK RD, WORCESTER, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,649,000 
    • 896 SUMMERSET PL AMBLER, PA 896 SUMMERSET PL, AMBLER, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,545,000 
    • 717 WILLOW RUN RD LOWER GWYNEDD, PA 717 WILLOW RUN RD, LOWER GWYNEDD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,499,000 Price reduced from $1,595,000 (-$96,000)
    • 121 INDEPENDENCE LN CHALFONT, PA 121 INDEPENDENCE LN, CHALFONT, PA Commercial for sale. $1,400,000 
    • 445 AMBLER RD FORT WASHINGTON, PA 445 AMBLER RD, FORT WASHINGTON, PA Farm/Ranch | Detached for sale. $1,395,000 
    • 1523 SUSQUEHANNA RD RYDAL, PA 1523 SUSQUEHANNA RD, RYDAL, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,395,000 
    • 1140 RYDAL RD Rydal, PA 1140 RYDAL RD, Rydal, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,395,000 
    • 1740 MEADOWBROOK RD MEADOWBROOK, PA 1740 MEADOWBROOK RD, MEADOWBROOK, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,375,000 
    • 1511 SUSQUEHANNA RD RYDAL, PA 1511 SUSQUEHANNA RD, RYDAL, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,350,000 
    • 1508 GRASSHOPPER LN GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA 1508 GRASSHOPPER LN, GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,299,900 Price reduced from $1,399,900 (-$100,000)
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  • Home Matters Newsletter

    • In this Edition: Keep Your AC Use in Check

      Our lead story in this month’s Home Matters examines simple ways to give your AC a break as we make our way through the remainder of the summer. Other topics covered this month include common culprits that could be keeping your veggie garden from thriving and what you need to know so that you don’t become a victim of a social media scam. We hope you enjoy this month’s edition of Home Matters and as always, we welcome your feedback. Email us anytime!

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 15 Jul 2018

    • Cool Your AC Costs With These Simple Tips

      As temperatures skyrocket during the dog days of summer, so do air conditioning costs as we work to maintain climate control within our homes. But finding a way to keep AC usage in check can prevent utility bills from getting too high. In fact, according to the Department of Energy, you’ll save approximately 3 percent on your utility bill for every degree you raise the set temperature for your central air.

      While the temperature you choose to keep your central air set to is ultimately a matter of your own personal comfort, Energy Star recommends that for optimal cooling and energy efficiency, you should keep your house set to 78 degrees Fahrenheit when you’re home and awake, 85 degrees Fahrenheit when you’re at work or away, and 82 degrees Fahrenheit when you’re sleeping.
       
      If that sounds a little too toasty for your liking, try going down by 1 degree at a time (bearing in mind the 3 percent savings per degree formula). Or, if you can handle the heat, go up a degree or two to lower your energy bill, and try some of these other suggestions from Consumer Reports for cooling off at home:

      • Use your ceiling fan or box fans, if you have them, which will create a wind chill effect in your home, provided the humidity isn’t too high.
      • If you have a programmable thermostat, use your smartphone to set your AC to shut off then turn on an hour before you arrive home. That way it’s off for a good chunk of the day.
      • If the temperature is really on the rise outside, avoid using appliances like your washer and dryer, dishwasher and oven, which will generate more heat.
      • Avoid cooking indoors altogether by eating cold foods, like salads, sandwiches and smoothies, or grilling outside. 
      The best tip of all? Next time you’re about to complain about the heat, remember what it felt like on a cold winter day. Your warm home suddenly might not feel so warm after all!

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 15 Jul 2018

    • How to Revive a Lackluster Veggie Garden

      Many of us kick off summer with ambitious plans for a bountiful vegetable garden, only to find ourselves disappointed with poor growth and no signs of fruit a few weeks later. However, it might not be your lack of a green thumb, but rather, several common culprits that are responsible for a lagging veggie garden. Consider whether any of the following are at play:

      • Not enough sunlight. To grow strong and thrive, most vegetables need at least eight hours of sunlight a day, especially the fruit-bearing kind, like tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers. You might be able to grow some leafy greens and herbs in partial sunlight, but that’s about it.
      • Poor soil. Rich, healthy soil is critical for growing veggies. A soil test will give you a good idea of your soil’s fertility and pH level. If it’s not up to par, try a homemade compost or organic fertilizers to help improve your soil quality.
      • Not enough (or too much) water. The right amount of water is critical. Newly seeded beds will need frequent watering; however, established crops can get by on one or two inches of water per week, says Nikki Jabbour at savvygardening.com. She recommends conserving water by mulching the soil with several inches of straw or shredded leaves, which will also go a long way toward reducing weeds.
      • Critters. Moles, deer, rabbits and the like can make a feast out of your vegetable garden, and are pretty crafty about gaining access. Make sure your fencing extends six inches under the soil to prevent bunnies from burrowing underneath, and at least eight feet above the ground to prevent deer from jumping over. 
      Before you throw in the towel, assess the situation and see if you can troubleshoot any of the areas above to bring your vegetable garden back to life so that you can enjoy a healthy harvest before summer’s out.
       

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 15 Jul 2018

    • 5 Great Ways to Decorate an Exposed Brick Wall

      Have a room with an exposed brick wall? Lucky you! Not only is the brick itself an irresistible design element, with a few simple décor tricks, you can amp up the chic factor even further.
       
      Try these suggestions from the experts at American Home Shield.

      Place an open-backed shelving unit in front of it to allow the brick to show through, instead of opting for a traditional, close-backed bookcase. Keep the amount of items you place on the bookcase sparse to expose as much of the brick as possible, and opt for a natural wood or metal style that melds well with the brick.

      Instead of hanging décor, lean large items against the brick wall, like a full-length mirror, framed print or an antique sign. This plays well with the contemporary, urban style that brick walls often exude.

      Contrast the rich tone of the brick with vibrant pops of color in the form of a bold velvet settee, a floor lamp with a bright lamp shade, or a few fun throw pillows. The neutral palette of the brick gives you a blank canvas to work with.

      Complement the warm red tones of the brick with wood accents and greenery in the form of picture frames and wood-framed furniture, accented by a couple of ferns or ficus trees. This will give your room a warm, rustic and country vibe as opposed to a modern, city feel.

      You can also change the look of the room completely by painting the brick. Create a distressed look by using colors or stencils sporadically as you might see in an old warehouse, or make a uniformed statement by whitewashing the entire wall or painting it an unusual color. Talk to a paint expert about the best way to prep the brick before painting.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 15 Jul 2018

    • Safety Watch: How to Recognize Social Media Scams

      Social media is a great way to unwind, catch up on the latest trends and news, and connect with friends and followers. However, fraudsters have found ways to infiltrate social media sites to take advantage of unsuspecting victims. Jackie MacKnight of the Connecticut Better Business Bureau advises social media users to watch out for the following scams when scrolling through your favorite feeds:
       
      Like-Farming. This scam involves the creation of emotionally driven posts—think sick children, lost animals, political ire—designed to generate massive amounts of likes and shares. According to MacKnight, some of these posts even claim that Facebook will donate money for every comment or share. As people like and share the post, its audience increases, at which point the scammer will edit the post to include a malicious component, such as a link to a website that downloads malware to your machine, or they may resell the page on the black market to buyers who will use it to spam followers or harvest the information Facebook provides.

      Blackmail. While one of the best parts about social media is the ease of sharing photos, unfortunately, it’s extremely easy for these photos to be stolen and used for nefarious purposes, including blackmail. The surefire way to avoid this is to never share photos of yourself in compromising positions. Make sure your privacy settings are set so that your friends and followers can’t share such photos without your approval, as well.

      Phishing. Phishing scams have also made their way to social media, so steer clear of anyone claiming to be from your bank, credit card company, utility company or anyone else you do business with. The rule of thumb when it comes to identifying a phishing scam? These institutions will never ask for personal information like your credit card number, Social Security Number, passwords, etc., online. Inform them that you will call them directly on the number you have for them to verify the call before providing any information.

      Generally speaking, to steer clear of such scams and stay safe on social media, MacKnight recommends following some common sense safety measures, such as avoiding offers that sound too good to be true, only liking posts and articles that are legitimate, and being extremely cautious when it comes to sharing personal information. Never provide your address, phone number, birth date, etc., to a person or company you don’t know or trust.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 15 Jul 2018