Help
  • Property Search

    Search 50,434 active listings
    Sorry! We could not find a location to match your search criteria. Please try again.
    Search Tips
    City or Township Devon, PA
    Postal Code 19333, PA
    Neighborhood Neighborhood, Devon, PA
    School District School District, County, PA
    Listing Service Area Area, PA
    Address 123 Main St, Devon, PA
    Street Main St, Devon, PA
    Listing ID #123456
  • FREE MONTHLY HOME REPORT CARD

  • Checkout our listings

    • A1 ASHBOURNE RD ELKINS PARK, PA A1 ASHBOURNE RD, ELKINS PARK, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $16,500,000 Price reduced from $17,500,000 (-$1,000,000)
    • 920 SPRING AVE ELKINS PARK, PA 920 SPRING AVE, ELKINS PARK, PA Lot/Land for sale. $16,500,000 Price reduced from $17,500,000 (-$1,000,000)
    • 525 LEWIS LN AMBLER, PA 525 LEWIS LN, AMBLER, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $9,250,000 
    • 1509 LATCHSTRING LN GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA 1509 LATCHSTRING LN, GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $4,750,000 
    • 1345 GYPSY HILL RD GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA 1345 GYPSY HILL RD, GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $2,950,000 
    • 108 PENNFIELD DR KENNETT SQUARE, PA 108 PENNFIELD DR, KENNETT SQUARE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $2,950,000 
    • 882 S PENN OAK RD S LOWER GWYNEDD, PA 882 S PENN OAK RD S, LOWER GWYNEDD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $2,550,000 
    • 1495 FARMINGTON AVE POTTSTOWN, PA 1495 FARMINGTON AVE, POTTSTOWN, PA Commercial for sale. $1,690,000 
    • 3160 DEER CREEK RD COLLEGEVILLE, PA 3160 DEER CREEK RD, COLLEGEVILLE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,675,000 
    • 831 S PENN OAK RD LOWER GWYNEDD, PA 831 S PENN OAK RD, LOWER GWYNEDD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,625,000 
    • 1427 BAINBRIDGE ST PHILADELPHIA, PA 1427 BAINBRIDGE ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA Condo/Townhome | Townhouse/Row for sale. $1,600,000 Price reduced from $1,695,000 (-$95,000)
    • 717 WILLOW RUN RD AMBLER, PA 717 WILLOW RUN RD, AMBLER, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,595,000 
    • LOT 3 STENTON AVE PLYMOUTH MEETING, PA LOT 3 STENTON AVE, PLYMOUTH MEETING, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,595,000 
    • 1511 SUSQUEHANNA RD RYDAL, PA 1511 SUSQUEHANNA RD, RYDAL, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,569,900 
    • 1740 MEADOWBROOK RD MEADOWBROOK, PA 1740 MEADOWBROOK RD, MEADOWBROOK, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,495,000 
    • 1523 SUSQUEHANNA RD JENKINTOWN, PA 1523 SUSQUEHANNA RD, JENKINTOWN, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,495,000 
    • 1140 RYDAL RD JENKINTOWN, PA 1140 RYDAL RD, JENKINTOWN, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,495,000 
    • 1295 S AVIGNON DR GLADWYNE, PA 1295 S AVIGNON DR, GLADWYNE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,444,000 Price reduced from $1,488,000 (-$44,000)
    • 709 PENLLYN PIKE LOWER GWYNEDD, PA 709 PENLLYN PIKE, LOWER GWYNEDD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,350,000 
    • 9 WHITEFIELD DR LAFAYETTE HILL, PA 9 WHITEFIELD DR, LAFAYETTE HILL, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,299,000 
  • Get Free Home Evaluation

  • Home Matters Newsletter

    • In this Edition: Insurance Claims

      Our lead story in this month’s Home Matters examines six tips to keep in mind when filing an insurance claim after a storm. Other topics covered this month include what not to do after purchasing a home and how to safely use your portable generator. We hope you enjoy this month’s edition of Home Matters and as always, we welcome your feedback. Email us anytime!

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 17 Sep 2017

    • 6 Tips for Filing an Insurance Claim After a Storm

      Whether reporting storm damage to your property over the phone or through your mobile device, the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) offers the following tips on how to file an insurance claim:

      1. Contact your insurer as soon as possible to begin the process. Provide your insurer with your policy number and the best phone number and email address at which to reach you. After a major storm, insurers visit those with the most severe damage first. Be prepared to provide an accurate description of the extent of the property damage. Explain any special needs of your family, particularly if personal circumstances require that you get priority. Ask your insurer when you can expect to be contacted by an insurance adjuster so you're ready for the visit. Since adjusters may be in areas in which cellphone towers are damaged, it's also a good idea to get the phone number of your adjuster's supervisor so you have an additional contact. If you have a flood insurance claim, contact the agent or broker who sold you the policy to start the claims filing process.
      2. Document your loss. The insurance adjuster will most likely inspect the damage to your home, auto and possessions in order to write a check to help you replace, repair and rebuild. It's a good idea to take photographs and document the details of damaged items, including the date of purchase and approximate value—and collect receipts, if you have them. Many companies will ask you to submit an inventory of the items.
      3. Check with your insurer before discarding damaged items and materials. You will generally need to show storm damaged items to your adjuster. If, however, you're required by your local municipality to discard them for safety reasons, take photographs to help with the claims process.
      4. Sign up for SMS/text alerts. Many insurance companies use SMS/text message alerts that will notify you of the status of your claim. You will receive text messages on your phone when you first report your claim, when your estimate is available, and when a payment has been sent.
      5. Know what emergency services are available. In the event you need emergency services, such as removing water from your home, covering your roof, or boarding up windows or doors, many companies will dispatch an approved emergency services company to protect your home from further damage. If your home has sustained severe damage, making it unlivable, your homeowners insurer will provide you with a check for additional living expenses.
      6. Keep a claim diary. Good record-keeping is important when filing a claim. Make a list of everyone you speak to about your claim. Note their name, title and contact information. Also, keep track of the date, time and issues discussed. The more organized you are, the simpler and easier the claims process will be. 
      Source: Insurance Information Institute

      If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 17 Sep 2017

    • Just Bought a Home? Here's What Not to Do

      Buying your first home is an exciting milestone, putting you on the path to a smart financial future. There are certain traps you can fall into as a new homeowner, however, that can put your financial well-being at risk. Avoid doing the following too soon:

      • Remodeling. Unless there’s something in need of serious repair, hold off on any remodeling projects. This will give you time to assess the cost vs. value of the project, ensuring that the money you put into it actually increases the value of your home. Waiting will also give you time to research and secure the best professionals to work with.
      • Furnishing the whole house. You don’t have to have every room perfectly outfitted at once. Take your time and settle in to your new home. This will give you time to make better furniture choices. It will also allow you to budget over time as opposed to a big financial hit all at once.
      • Taking out an equity loan. Let your equity serve as a cushion for future needs. As homeownership plays out, there are countless needs and issues that will arise. If you’ve already exhausted your equity, you won’t have that emergency fund at the ready.
      • Moving up. You might be on a mission to get to your next bigger and better home as soon as possible, but wait it out a bit. You want to make sure you have the finances to do so comfortably, and you want to make sure you choose the right location. Living in your current home will teach you a lot about your likes and dislikes.
      • Making major aesthetic changes. Don’t go crazy with paint, wallpaper or any other bold design statements just yet. You’re still in the getting-to-know-you phase, so feel your new home out for a while before you start changing its look.
      If you need more real estate information, feel free to contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 17 Sep 2017

    • Renters Want High-End Amenities and Sense of Community

      According to a nationwide survey of residents regarding their attitudes toward the rental market, renters are becoming more selective and amenity-driven, especially if those amenities make residences feel like true homes. In fact, only price and location were mentioned as more-important factors in housing decisions.

      The results of the First Annual National Renters Index, a nationwide survey of residents regarding their attitudes toward the rental market from Village Green, also show that trends like micro-units and co-living housing are growing in popularity. Forty-eight percent of millennials stated interest in paying more for "high-end property amenities." More specifically, millennials said they were willing to spend more for properties outfitted with smart-home technologies (45 percent) and high-end facility amenities such as concierge service and/or a coffee bar (49 percent).

      The Index also provided insight into where renters are looking for referrals and reviews as part of their search. Notably, 45 percent of renters said using third-party rental websites was important for their search, while 40 percent of renters mentioned online review sites as key resources and influencers for their housing hunt. This highlights the increasing importance of effective social media strategies, both proactive and reactive.

      If you’d like more information about homeownership, please contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 17 Sep 2017

    • Living Paycheck to Paycheck a Way of Life for Majority of U.S. Workers

      Are you counting the hours to pay day? You're not alone. More than three-quarters of workers (78 percent) are living paycheck to paycheck to make ends meet—up from 75 percent last year and a trait more common in women than men—81 vs. 75 percent, according to new CareerBuilder research. Thirty-eight percent of employees said they sometimes live paycheck to paycheck, 17 percent said they usually do, and 23 percent said they always do.

      The national survey, which was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder this past spring, included representative samples of 2,369 full-time employers and 3,462 full-time U.S. workers across industries and company sizes in the private sector.

      Having a higher salary doesn't necessarily mean money woes are behind you, with nearly one in 10 workers making $100,000 or more (9 percent) saying they usually or always live paycheck to paycheck and 59 percent in that income bracket in debt. Twenty-eight percent of workers making $50,000 -$99,999 usually or always live paycheck to paycheck, 70 percent are in debt; and 51 percent of those making less than $50,000 usually or always live paycheck to paycheck to make ends meet, while 73 percent are in debt.

      Meanwhile, a quarter of workers (25 percent) haven't been able to make ends meet every month in the last year, and 20 percent have missed payment on some smaller bills. Further, 71 percent of all workers say they're in debt—up from 68 percent last year. While 46 percent say their debt is manageable, more than half of those in debt (56 percent) say they feel they will always be in debt. And it should be noted that 18 percent of all workers have reduced their 401k contribution and/or personal savings in the last year, more than a third (38 percent) do not participate in a 401k plan, IRA or comparable retirement plan, and 26 percent haven't set aside any savings each month in the last year.

      Less than a third of workers (32 percent) stick to a clearly defined budget, and a slight majority (56 percent) save $100 or less a month:

      • None: 26 percent
      • Less than $50: 15 percent
      • $51 to $100: 16 percent
      • $101 to $250: 14 percent
      • $251 to $500: 11 percent
      • $501 to $750: 5 percent
      • $751 to $1,000: 4 percent
      • More than $1,000: 10 percent 
      Still, despite financial woes, there are certain things employees aren't willing to give up. When asked what they'd absolutely not give up, regardless of financial concerns, employees cited:
      • Internet connection: 54 percent
      • Mobile device (smartphone, tablet, etc.): 53 percent
      • Driving: 48 percent
      • Pets: 37 percent
      • Cable: 21 percent
      • Going out to eat: 19 percent
      • Traveling: 17 percent
      • Education: 13 percent
      • Buying gifts for people: 13 percent
      • Alcohol: 11 percent
      Source: CareerBuilder

      If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.


      Sun, 17 Sep 2017